Archive for January, 2009

Global Translator – Translates Your Blog Into 34 Languages

January 31, 2009

Now you can translate your blog content into 34 languages by using a free WordPress plugin, Global Translator!
What makes this translation plugin better and unique than the others, is that it doesn’t take your readers away from your blog. Instead all translated pages are kept on your blog and become new content. Which means search engines will index it too! Like that you add a ton of unique content without writing or anything. However this plugin give you the choice to include the translated pages in your sitemap if you want.

Global Translator provides a powerful features which are:
• Four different Translation Engines: it has the ability to provide the translations by using Google Translation Engine, Babel Fish, Promt, FreeTranslations.com
• Search Engine Optimized: it uses the permalinks by adding the language code at the beginning of all your URI. For example the english version on http://www.domain.com/mycategory/mypost will be automatically transformed in http://www.domain.com/en/mycategory/mypost
• Fast Caching System: new fast, smart, optimized, self-cleaning and built-in caching system. Drastically reduction of the risk of temporarily ban from translation engines.
• Fully configurable layout: you can easily customize the appearance of the translation bar by choosing between a TABLE or DIV layout for the flags bar and by selecting the number of translations to make available to your visitors
• No database modifications: Global Translator is not intrusive. It doesn’t create or alter any table on your database: this feature permits to obtain better performances.

Download: WordPress Global Translator

HowTo – Auto Update Copyright Notice

January 31, 2009

Making sure that your blog has updated copyright notice is very important from a branding and professionalism level, however many people consider it a minor issue.

For most bloggers it’s a simple task to FTP into the blog and edit its footer. But the problem is many bloggers forget about it because it’s done only once per year.

Today, i’ll teach you guys how to make it update automatically. How? it’s simple:

All you have to do is FTP into your blog and open the footer.php file. Find the part with the copyright notice and replace it with the following.

Copyright &copy; <?php echo date(’Y’); ?> Blog Name

or

Copyright &copy; 1990 – <?php echo date(’Y’); ?>  Blog Name

or for wordpress bloggers, you can download this plugin below:

Auto Copyright

Instead of hard coding 2009 into the copyright notice, you replace it with <?php echo date(’Y’); ?>, which will automatically fetch the year from your server. If your server does not give you the right year then you’ll have to contact your web host admin and have him adjust the date.

Now, instead of trying to remember to update the copyright notice at the start of every year, the blog will do it automatically.

Release: DotA Allstars 6.59

January 31, 2009

* Some performance improvements
* You can no longer attack items you do not own if they are in the fountain area
* Fixed some rare memory corruption bugs that could cause random abilities/items to malfunction or result in a fatal error
* Added a new subtle cooldown effect to make it a little clearer when spells are in cooldown and when they finish. This is mainly for long cooldown spells where it is sometimes difficult to tell. More work will be done in this area soon, but it needs a bit more time to make sure that anything extra is not visually intrusive. (PGRu-Unexpect3D)

* Reworked Enigma’s Conversion (see details below)
* Fixed a bug with Towers AI not defending heroes properly
* Reduced Ironwood Branch cost from 57 to 53 gold
* Increased Blademail duration from 4 to 5 seconds
* Improved Chaos Knight’s cast point
* Added a new experimental mode -er (-ExperimentalRunes, see details below)
* Improved Surge duration from 2/3.5/5/6.5 to 3/4.5/6/7.5 seconds
* Decreased Wrath of Nature manacost from 200/380/610 to 150/175/200
* Improved Antimage’s Strength by 2 points
* Increased model size of hexed units a bit
* Increased Curse of the Silent AOE and reduced cooldown slightly
* Decreased Powershot cooldown from 12 to 9 seconds
* Decreased Lightning Storm cooldown from 7 to 6 seconds
* Fixed Acid Spray from affecting Tombstone Zombies
* Spectral Dagger no longer gives vision
* Rebalanced Necrolyte’s Heartstopper from 250/500/750/1000 AOE with 1% drain to 700/800/900/1000 AOE with 0.5/0.75/1/1.25% drain
* Increased Fury Swipes buff duration from 3 to 5 seconds
* Fixed an issue with unit selection when respawning with Aegis while controlling other units
* When a player leaves, the state of his inventory is now recorded in the replay for easier parsing (Same 8_# actions)
* Improved Eidolons magic resistance a bit
* Fixed some minor technical issues with Mask of Madness

* Fixed scoreboard player names when a player switches with a leaver
* Switch no longer works when only 1 person agrees in a 1v1 situation
* Fixed Zombies continuing to spawn when the game is over
* Fixed Eidolon Acquire range and reduced collision size a bit
* Fixed -switch with frozen leaver heroes
* Abaddon now uses the Death Knight model instead of the Evil Arthas one (practically the same, but commonly requested)
* You now have vision over the area you cast Blackhole in (260562)
* Fixed Aegis dropping when using -switch
* Ball Lightning now gives a proper error message when casting without the required mana
* Fixed allied hero visibility when using -switch in -ah mode
* When players swap heroes, the new player/heroid data for replay parsers are updated
* Changed the model on Eidolons and adjusted the scales a bit
* Fixed some issues with Blackhole’s silence mechanism when applied to magic immune units
* Fixed some bugs when using -switch with Meepo

Demonic Conversion:
=====================
Splits any non-hero unit into three Eidolons, killing the targeted unit.
Eidolon’s can duplicate themselves once whenever they attack 6 times.

Lesser Eidolon/Eidolon/Greater Eidolon/Dire Eidolon (Same as before)

Cooldown: 35
Manacost: 170

Notes: It cannot target Level 5+ Neutral Creeps

Experimental Runes
====================
This temporary mode changes the rune system to a more experimental one. I will be changing how -er works from version to version to try out different ideas. I don’t plan on any one version of the new runes to replace the current system directly, so do not panic Well Instead, it will be used as something to create discussion, spark ideas, find flaws and playtest different concepts over time.

How -er works for this version: Runes spawn simultaneously on both sides at 3 minute intervals (instead of 2). Again I have no plans to make this permanant.

Notes: I wanted to release this sooner rather than later because of some important code fixes. I am planning on finishing the traditional .x9 quest for v6.59b (along with some more balance tweaks) and then followed by TC in 6.60 if everythings work out right.

Download here

Credit: IceFrog

WordPress.com To WordPress.org Migration

January 31, 2009

WordPress To WordPressMoving a Blog from WordPress.com to WordPress.org is something I’ve had a lot of questions about – today Jeff Chandler shares tips on hwo to do it.

Everyday it seems like I find a story or two from a cities local online newspaper which delves into the topic of blogging and what it’s all about. The story usually goes through a mini backlog of history surrounding the term, what blogging is and at the end of the article, there is usually a list of suggestions on how to get started with the most popular suggestion being WordPress.com. Using WordPress.com is a great way to introduce yourself to blogging but if you decide that you want to turn blogging into a full time job or just want more control over your work, you’ll need to move.

Thankfully, the move from WordPress.com to WordPress.org (WordPress.org being the self hosted version of WordPress) is painless thanks in large part to a great export tool.

Tools ImportTo start things off, login to your WordPress.com account and browse to your administration panel. From the menu on the left, click on TOOLS – EXPORT. At this point, you have the option to confine the export to a particular author or all authors. Using the export tool will compile your posts, pages, comments, custom fields, categories, and tags. This information is placed into a WXR file or, WordPress eXtended RSS file. Essentially, this file is just a normal XML RSS based file with a couple of custom fields added to it which makes it specific to WordPress. Once you’re finished, click on the Download Export File button and save it to your desktop.

Once you have that file on your desktop, you can breath a little easier considering your half way through the content migration process.

The second part of this guide refers to an installation of WordPress 2.7. Login to your self installed WordPress administration panel and from the menu on the left click on TOOLS – IMPORT. From the list of blogging systems click on WordPress. Next, click on the Browse button and locate the XML file you downloaded earlier. This will upload the XML file into your WordPress installation and will unpack all of the data the file contains. There is one caveat though regarding this entire technique.

Most webhosts for whatever reason still have their PHP.ini configured in such a way where end users can only upload files with a maximum file size of 2MB or smaller. Although it takes quite a bit of content in an WXR file to go over 2MB, 2MB is not a lot of head room. If you find yourself in the position where your WXR file is larger than the maximum file size, I highly suggest submitting a trouble ticket to your webhost and asking them to increase the limit. If they choose not to, then ask them if they can import the file for you. If that doesn’t work, you can pull a trick from your sleeve by uploading a custom php.ini file to your webhosting accounts root folder. This is what my host did for me and afterwards, I took a look at the php.ini file and noticed it had this line in it:

; Maximum allowed size for uploaded files.

upload_max_filesize = 7M

Apparently, the php.ini file overwrote the settings on the original file and I was able to bump my limit up to 7 Megabytes. This trick is not guaranteed to work. As a last ditch effort, you can also try adding these lines to your .htaccess file. Just replace the pound sign with a number that is above the size of your WXR file.

#set max upload file size

php_value upload_max_filesize #M

#set max post size

php_value post_max_size #M

Once the WXR file is unpacked on your self installed version of WordPress, you’re ready to walk through the gates of freedom without skipping a beat!

P.S. This strategy also works for those wanting to go from WordPress.org to WordPress.com.

Credits: problogger.net

Adsense for Feeds

January 31, 2009

As many of you know, since becoming a part of Google in June of 2007, the FeedBurner team has been hard at work transforming FeedBurner into a service that uses the same underlying architecture as many other Google applications, running in the same high-volume datacenters. As a team, we chose this path for one reason: our highest priority is making sure your feed is served as fast as possible after you update your content, and is as close as technically possible to being available 100% of the time.

As many of you also know, a month ago we opened up ability for all AdSense publishers to move to this new platform, and just a few days ago made this move available to all FeedBurner publishers. What many of you do not know is that we have been carefully moving publishers for about six months now, looking hard at traffic patterns, debugging issues with these account transfers with publishers and their hosting and service providers, and working with many of our partners (including many other teams at Google) who run feed aggregation platforms to ensure feeds from this new platform are polled and distributed as fast and reliably as possible. (One example: we moved over 100 external Google blogs and their respective FeedBurner feeds over to the new platform as soon as we could; charity (and bug-fixing) begins at home!)

We are very aware of our responsibility to the RSS ecosystem. We are aware we host and provide service to not only some of the largest publishers, but also the feed for your site, the feeds that you rely on for mission-critical news and information, and even some feeds government provides to distribute information on a timely basis to their citizens. We know that many of you run businesses that critically depend on your feed being delivered quickly and reliably, and thus have been working with many of you to ensure that these feeds are delivered in tandem with a monetization solution that allows you to continue business as we go through this transition. FeedBurner has the privilege of serving millions of feeds globally that represent an incredibly wide spectrum of content.

It is this scale however, that makes our transition to Google’s platform technically complex, and as we have started to open up account transfers to all users, it has also amplified the permutations of publisher web server configs, service providers, feed readers, search engines, and so on, and so on. We want to ensure that the time we spend tackling this technical complexity is not mistaken for lack of urgency, concern, or priority.

Just as an example, we are aware and have been working on a known issue of returning a “502 Error” or “503 Error” when checking for updates after certain feeds are migrated. This is a very general error message, representing a number of underlying issues, but in many cases it is a service provider throttling or disallowing traffic from Google. Although we came across many of these issues during our testing phase, in reality we knew a lot of these challenges would not fully surface until we released at scale, which we now have and are dealing with as high priority issues within Google.

To help communicate these issues and resolutions much more effectively, we have created a new blog and feed that you can subscribe to during this transition period. We plan to keep these around as long as necessary. We may also add features to the site that allow you to report your own feed issue details.

The extended team — including both original team members of FeedBurner, newer team members that joined us since we’ve been at Google, and the rest of Google — is excited about our future on this new integrated-with-Google platform that all publishers will be on at the conclusion of this account transfer process. We are excited because we see the potential for scale and innovation on this platform that will make for a true next generation feed management solution. Most of all, however, we are excited about getting publishers excited for these possibilities as we reveal what we have in store.

Credits: